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3D Printed Solid - Large Format Printer

Discussion in '3D printers' started by Greg Heffner, Nov 29, 2015.

  1. Greg Heffner

    Greg Heffner Well-Known
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    Greg Heffner published a new build:

    Read more about this build...
     
  2. Steven Bloom

    Steven Bloom Veteran
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    That's a big bed. Just make sure you find a headbed that works on 110v.
     
  3. Greg Heffner

    Greg Heffner Well-Known
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    Thanks Steve, I hope to get them custom made and divide the bed in half using two heaters. How familiar are you with boards?
     
  4. Steven Bloom

    Steven Bloom Veteran
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    Are you talking about the 3d electronics ?? If so I am very familiar. You also can look at my design called the BAFP 3d printer. It not quite as big as you need but the design ideas might save you some time. You might also be able to get 1 heated bed that size.

    Thanks Steven
     
  5. stargeezer

    stargeezer Veteran
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    The Rumba board may have enough drivers for your extruders, etc. Trigger the heat beds with a couple relays and separate power supplies. Run the 4 z steppers using separate driver boards, like a CNC mill. 4 Nema17's can run on one supply and pull the direction and pulse signals from the Z axis Ramps chip socket.

    We have a huge assortment of very, very smart builders here that I learn a new trick from every time I check in. I'll be watching as much for their responses as seeing your build come to life. It should be impressive.
     
  6. stargeezer

    stargeezer Veteran
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    FWiW, I think I'd increase the build plate to at least 1/4" (0.250"), or even 3/8" (0.375") would be better. A 42x47" plate is going to have a tendency to bow a lot unless you put a lot of support under it or have it much thicker than you'd like.
     
  7. Greg Heffner

    Greg Heffner Well-Known
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    Thanks for the information, I don't have a lot of expertise in electronics, but I am talking to someone who may be able to help me. I will look into the Rumba, thanks again.
     
  8. Steven Bloom

    Steven Bloom Veteran
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    I have a Rumba card on my big printer and we are also using it for the new one I am building. I like how big the printer is going to be. I am just concerned that you are using a moving build plate vs a stationary one. That is going to be a huge amount of weight to move up and down.

    Thanks Steven
     
  9. stargeezer

    stargeezer Veteran
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    Hey Steven, I just received my first Rumba, Are there any oddities with the firmware? I really like the appearance of the board.
     
  10. Steven Bloom

    Steven Bloom Veteran
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    There is only one weird thing that can possibly happen. Sometimes there has been an incompatibility between the rumba drivers and the USB drivers on specific computers. I have seen this happen twice where you cant load the drivers on a computer. But most computers work fine. After that, just load the current Marlin release and make your changes to the configuration file. Also always power down / up the rumba board before you load firmware changes.
     
  11. Greg Heffner

    Greg Heffner Well-Known
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    Hey Steven, This is the reason why I want to use (4) steppers on the z-axis. A 3/16" plate is around 35+lbs + bearings, and all the other frame work. It adds up to a lot of weight.
     
  12. Greg Heffner

    Greg Heffner Well-Known
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    Are you familiar with the Rambo or AZTEEG X3 PRO boards?
     
  13. Steven Bloom

    Steven Bloom Veteran
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    So why not move your print head up and down. A lot less weight / motors / drivers and thibgs to go wrong
     
  14. Steven Bloom

    Steven Bloom Veteran
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    I have seen them but rumba board is a great value. They all work basically the same anyway
     
  15. Greg Heffner

    Greg Heffner Well-Known
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    There are many ways to go. I like this design.
     
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  16. Steven Bloom

    Steven Bloom Veteran
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    Hey, any updates on this ?? I want to see this one finished !! Its going to be big
     
  17. Greg Heffner

    Greg Heffner Well-Known
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    Hello, I just got a Rambo board and LCD. I also pick up the aluminum bed plate and some more bar stock for the brackets. I went with 1/4" bed plate instead of 3/16".
    I have the frame together, it is really strong. You know go big or go home! :0
     

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    CreativeOffroad and Steven Bloom like this.
  18. Tim N

    Tim N Well-Known
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    That thing is gigantic...
     
  19. stargeezer

    stargeezer Veteran
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    That is so solid looking, I bet you could hold up a car! If you had a GOOD tig welder around who could tig those corners together it might be stronger, but other than that, I couldn't guess what else you could do to improve them. Great Job!
     
  20. Steven Bloom

    Steven Bloom Veteran
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    Any new progress ??
     
  21. Val Cocora

    Val Cocora Veteran
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    Indeed, it may sound counter intuitive at first, but lowering the bed one layer at a time seems to be a better solution than having the extruder flying around.
    Imagine you have to print a large section (worst case scenario). The bed won't move down until the first layer is completed, which may take a while, depending on the complexity. If the x and y axis are part of the machine frame, they will be inherently stiffer.
    On the other hand, keeping the bed fixed and having the extruder move around on its own mobile sub-frame, might invite trouble.
    One gives up the natural stiffness, provided best by the very machine frame, and I believe the gain in speed would not be very significant.
    My first approach was fixed bed and mobile x and y axis, until I realized that when a 2lbs. extruder such as mine, when moving along the axis at high speed, will create quite a push onto the rails and the screws due to inertial forces.
    Resting the x and y axis on the frame and having the bed move down one layer at a time seems to be the best approach, especially for large printers.
     
  22. Val Cocora

    Val Cocora Veteran
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    Greg, I am using a smoothieboard for my printer.
    The printer has four nema23 for the bed lead screws, two nema23 for the y axis, two nema17 for the x axis and two nema11 for the dual extruder.
    If you can wait a bit, the new smoothieboard 2.0 is in the works, check with arthur wolfe for more info.
     
  23. Greg Heffner

    Greg Heffner Well-Known
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    Hi Val, thanks for the information. The smoothie board can handle all those motors without any overheating issues? Also what about the firmware, was this difficult to set up using (4) z-axis motors?

    Greg
     
  24. Val Cocora

    Val Cocora Veteran
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    Hi Greg,

    Yes, the smoothie handles everything with no problem whatsoever. In order to give you the right picture, please be advised I am using external stepper drivers, rated at 5 amps, whereas the nemas 23 are rated at 4.5 amps. The four z axis stepper drivers are linked in parallel, as are the two nemas 23 for the parallel y axis, and the two nemas 17 for the x axis. As far as setup is concerned, all I had to do was the proper wiring (parallel, as mentioned) of the stepper drivers, bypass the onboard drivers (which, at 2 amps are too weak to handle a nema 23) then plug in the end stops, smoothie, the works, and it worked at first crank. If you follow the proper procedures, it will work. The reasons I chose the smoothie are its arm32 processor, several times faster than arduino's cpu. Configuring it is really simple, and the onboard firmware is updatable like a computer. Please find attached pdf, showing the axis and steppers layout, very similar to yours, and a picture showing the parallel connections of the stepper drivers, to help you visualize my above explanation. One more thing: I am not an electronics expert myself, but my associate has a PhD and a lot of experience in this field, and he warmly recommended the smoothie over arduino or rambo, due to its setup simplicity and ease of use.
     

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  25. alar

    alar New
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    Val, Greg, You seem to have good knowledge of the smoothieboard setup so I'mhoping you might be able to make a suggestion ( I'm not trying to hijack the thread) My son and I have built the physical parts of our printer, and are trying to install the smoothie board. We are stuck at the wiring layout where they suggest directly running pos+ power to each of the mosfets. They also show that a diode needs to be the pos+ line (to left part of the image near the 12-24v inputs) . In all my reading I have found no real indication of the proper type or size for the diode they suggest be placed inline, at the VBB (a notation about the fan section shows 2 small 1a ones to install behind fan mosfets, but that is all). Is something like a # 1N2128A .. 50v 60A Power silicone rectifier diode the right kind? do I need to worry about any voltage drop? smoothieboard wire.png diode.jpg Thanks,
     
  26. Greg Heffner

    Greg Heffner Well-Known
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    I have not gotten that far, but Val may be able to help.

    I just got the remaining parts I have been waiting for. I should be able to put the table on my printer. Got some machining to do on the bracket and support frame.

    :) Me.
     
  27. Steven Bloom

    Steven Bloom Veteran
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    looks very nice !!!
     
  28. Val Cocora

    Val Cocora Veteran
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    hi alar,

    you give me too much credit with regards to the smoothieboard.
    as i was saying in my previous post, i have a lot of help with the electronics from my associate. i regret i cannot help you myself with the technical question you posted, but please be advised i connected my smoothie to a windows 8 samsung tablet via usb port, thus solving the power supplying issue to the board itself. while this may not be a permanent solution if one wants to run the printer independently via sd card, it does help greatly in the incipient phase of fine tuning and adjusting the machine, where one needs access to configuration parameters, manual control, etc, via a computer interface, not to mention it is the quickest shortcut for an electronics ignoramus like me.
    however, since your question should be answered, may i suggest you contact arthur wolf, the inventor of smoothieboard?
    his email is wolf.arthur@gmail.com, and, obviously, he is the most knowledgeable person in the world to help you, he IS smoothieboard, and a very nice guy who always helps the users of his products.
     
  29. alar

    alar New
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    Thanks for the info Val. Yesterday I had actually posted the question to Arthur because his name showed up a lot on the smoothieboard forum, I didn't know he was the creator. I haven't heard back yet but I figure he's at CES so it may be a few more days till I get his answer. We are using the sub to program and 5v. The diodes were
     
  30. Greg Heffner

    Greg Heffner Well-Known
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    I got my frame brackets partially machined and set in place, bearings attached, and loosely assembled. The frame slides very nicely but weights a ton. I have to take a bunch of weight of the brackets yet but I want to finish the plate mounting first, just in case I want to modify the design a bit.
     

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