Welcome to Our Community

Some features disabled for guests. Register Today.

C-Beam Max Cutting Size

Discussion in 'CNC Mills/Routers' started by Jose Martinez Jr, Jan 31, 2016.

  1. Jose Martinez Jr

    Jose Martinez Jr Well-Known
    Builder

    Joined:
    Jan 20, 2016
    Messages:
    9
    Likes Received:
    3
    Hey folks, I'm a newbie here as well as in CNC routers, however I was captivated by the C-Beam machine and I'm getting an order ready.
    My use for this machine is to cut aluminum (plastics as well) to a max size of 12"x12". I see the machine specs mentioned travel sizes in 13.5" x 11"; However I saw this U-Tube video "" (bad audio) which seems to suggest that with some re-alignment of the Y axis you can get a 12"x12" cut.
    Can someone set me straight on this before I put in an order for more parts than I need

    Thanks.......
     
  2. Robert Bailey

    Robert Bailey Veteran
    Builder

    Joined:
    Mar 23, 2015
    Messages:
    117
    Likes Received:
    70
    mine isn't the plate maker but it is built out of the c-beams, my spoil board is 24x24 but the travel of the router is about 32x32
     
  3. Jose Martinez Jr

    Jose Martinez Jr Well-Known
    Builder

    Joined:
    Jan 20, 2016
    Messages:
    9
    Likes Received:
    3
    Well the author of the YouTube video posted this reply to my query there...

    I was not able to get that much travel on the kit. it maxed out the mechanical travel at 10.400" on the Y axis. The X axis does however, travel the full 12". It has to do with the button head screws on the bottom of the mounting plate for the table. The shaft collars that go on the acme thread interfere with the travel. you could pick up another .375" or around 10mm of travel on the y is you go with low profile screws. This still won't get you to 12" though. My advice would be to but you a copy of this machine with 750mm axis beams to keep it small or just get the full 1m c beams and go all out. The machine does hold tolerances of around.005" taking full depth cuts .500" at 20" a minute with a step over of .125". not bad for such a light weight machine. if you go light shallow passes like .040 as people do with the belt driven gantry's in red oak I cut 60-80" a minute no problems.

    I guess I'll have to go with the 1k railings and screw (more $'s) and customize my dimensions.
     
  4. Rick 2.0

    Rick 2.0 OpenBuilds Team
    Staff Member Moderator Builder

    Joined:
    Dec 20, 2013
    Messages:
    1,359
    Likes Received:
    537
    The Universal Build Plate is 216mm long sliding along a Y-axis rail that is 500mm. That leaves 11.18" of travel. When you lose 3/8" each end due to the lock collars, that leaves 10.4" (as noted above). The X-axis however has an 88mm plate running on a 500mm rail which leaves 16.22" of travel and when accounting for lock collars, 15.5" of travel. If you need to get this to a 12x12 cutting area and do it without adding any additional $$, start with a 1m piece of CBeam, (2) 1m pieces of the 20x60 bottom and side rails, and a 1m piece of lead screw and have them all cut 450/550. This will revise your system to a 450mm x 550mm format which should give you what you seek in each direction (unless I've missed something somewhere).

    The easier solution however would be to pick up a couple pieces of aluminum bar roughly 8x20x160mm and 4 longer screws for the main wheels and jack the build plate up 8mm where it can simply ride an inch or so out over the end plates. While this will cost you 8mm of throat depth, by eliminating the 6mm spacers that go between the build plate and the sacrificial work board the net loss will only be about 2mm which should be acceptable.
     
  5. Jose Martinez Jr

    Jose Martinez Jr Well-Known
    Builder

    Joined:
    Jan 20, 2016
    Messages:
    9
    Likes Received:
    3
    Rick, I understand your first option (which is what I'm currently planing) is to buy the pieces from the OB store rather than a bundle, to change the dimensions of the X or Y axis as well as using parts I already own.
    However your "easier solution" sounds easy enough to do. So a couple of questions...

    1) Will this get me to 12x12.
    2) When i see the word "travel" I assume that means how far the plate moves before it's stopped by the lock ring in the actuator. How does that relate to the actual travel of the cutting bit on the router.
     
  6. Rick 2.0

    Rick 2.0 OpenBuilds Team
    Staff Member Moderator Builder

    Joined:
    Dec 20, 2013
    Messages:
    1,359
    Likes Received:
    537
    1) Yes, it should give you roughly 12.25" of Y-axis movement. A bit more if you are willing to sculpt out some of the support board to clear the stepper (see below).
    2) Yes, travel is basically movement over a distance. Same idea as when you get off a train in another city or country and someone asks "how far did you travel?"

    Quick sketches attached. Spacer blocks should actually be 10mm thick. (I noticed a screw conflict and had to adjust a bit thicker.) Another 10mm spacer block will need to be added above the threaded nut block.


    Existing stops at edge of metal plate hits lock collar:
    Travel 1.jpg

    Revised allows metal plate to extend over lock collar and end plate but stops where spacer block hits lock collar:
    Travel 2.jpg
    Stops at motor on far end (unless you wish to carve out the lower board a bit).
    Travel 4.jpg
    Basic spacer block layout

    Travel 3.jpg
     
    Mark Carew likes this.
  7. Jose Martinez Jr

    Jose Martinez Jr Well-Known
    Builder

    Joined:
    Jan 20, 2016
    Messages:
    9
    Likes Received:
    3
    Wow, nothing like a picture !!!! Thanks, I can begin to cobble my order....
     

Share This Page

  • About Us

    The OpenBuilds Team is dedicated helping you to Dream it - Build it - Share it! Collaborate on our forums and be sure to visit the Part Store for all your Building needs!
  • Like us on Facebook

  • Support Open Source FairShare Program!

    OpenBuilds FairShare Give Back Program provides resources to Open Source projects, developers and schools around the world. Invest in your future by helping others develop theirs!

    Donate to FairShare!