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eeYZee Router

Discussion in 'CNC Mills/Routers' started by Colin Tree, Dec 28, 2015.

  1. Colin Tree

    Colin Tree Well-Known
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    Colin Tree published a new build:

    Read more about this build...
     
  2. Joe Santarsiero

    Joe Santarsiero OB addict
    Staff Member Moderator Builder

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    Wow Colin.
    Interesting design. Do the top rollers spin freely and the bottom drive the sheet?
     
  3. Colin Tree

    Colin Tree Well-Known
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    Yes, adjusted with a screw at each end, handles at the top. A consistent drive from the rollers was a major problem through development, everything from slipping to broken drive shafts. Also works with solid timber, that's spotted gum, janka hardness 2473, no problems.
    If I get further drive problems I will put a stepper motor on the top rollers.
     
  4. 3DMON

    3DMON Journeyman
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    It's the Phlatprinters big brother....Cool!
     
    Mark Carew likes this.
  5. Jonny Norris

    Jonny Norris Veteran
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    Interesting. Really like the concept. Couple of question though, what would happen if you remove too much surface material or want to face the board, do the rollers loose grip? And how do the rollers cope with any breakthrough material? Would imagine it would push the board proud of origin or do you have to onion skin everything? Imagine chips are problematic too?
     
    #5 Jonny Norris, Dec 28, 2015
    Last edited: Dec 28, 2015
  6. Colin Tree

    Colin Tree Well-Known
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    Yeah, I'm new to the site, saw the phlatprinter yesterday. It reminded me of large format page printers and plotters I used to repair.

    As with all routing you have to plan ahead.
    I also use a bench mounted router and the most time is spent preparing fences and supporting the stock.
    I route from a larger piece of wood and leave edges aligned with rollers to keep the X axis rollers happy.
    The rollers are at odd distances to give a flexible combination depending on width of stock. I spend a bit of time getting the roller pressure just right. Larger pieces of wood have quite a bit of momentum and that's how I snapped a drive shaft.
    The main fence is an aluminium T section for the Y=0 origin.
    I have bolted my stock to a carrier with rails, (the rails have to be higher than the stock) as an experiment a while ago and that was very successful.
    I'm a purist and wouldn't work with foam, only wood. But for future development I wanted to be able to let others shape surfboards from foam and they would use a carrier.
    One time I tried a cable pull type mechanism, bolted on each end of the stock, wrapped around a pulley. Didn't work, I've tried lots of different methods.
    When routing ply I draw in tabs to keep the plugs in place. Small plugs can fall through, there's an 80 mm gap along the Y axis, under the cutting head.
    I've still got to put the vacuum attachment on the router, at present I keep a pretty close eye on any job and vacuum by hand.
    The big red button is close at hand. It kills power to the router and motor drivers, stops all motion immediately, no mucking around with switch inputs and software control.
     
    Tigerbot likes this.

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