Welcome to Our Community

Unlock hidden features. Sign Up for Free Today!

Looking for advice for new build

Discussion in 'CNC Lathes' started by Jon Norris, Mar 7, 2016.

  1. Jon Norris

    Jon Norris Journeyman
    Builder

    Joined:
    Feb 14, 2016
    Messages:
    17
    Likes Received:
    26
    I'm new to the CNC world, and I'm looking for some advice on a new build. I make woodwind instruments for a living, and I'm designing a machine similar to the rotary builds by gwandad and dougsnash, but using the C Beam actuators in the store. It will just have the X and Z axis, plus a rotary for A axis. At this point, I'm planning to use VCarve Pro to design, as it will do everything I need (shaping the spindle, carving recesses for inlay, etc.). Where I could use some input is on Control Software and Controller Boards. I've been reading like crazy on this site and others, and I see tons of potential options -- Mach3/Mach4, LinuxCNC, GCodeSender, TinyG and XPro and Arduino or RPi based systems. I see pros and cons to a lot of them, but I'm looking for some input from some of you experts on which way to go before I start ordering parts. Thanks!
     
  2. Jon Norris

    Jon Norris Journeyman
    Builder

    Joined:
    Feb 14, 2016
    Messages:
    17
    Likes Received:
    26
    Here's a quick look at the machine I'm planning (and yes, it's my first attempt at using SketchUp, so it's far from perfect).
     

    Attached Files:

  3. Rick 2.0

    Rick 2.0 OpenBuilds Team
    Staff Member Moderator Builder

    Joined:
    Dec 20, 2013
    Messages:
    1,099
    Likes Received:
    403
    Nice start. :thumbsup: If you'll post your SketchUp file, I can offer a couple simple suggestions that might save you a few dollars.
     
  4. Jon Norris

    Jon Norris Journeyman
    Builder

    Joined:
    Feb 14, 2016
    Messages:
    17
    Likes Received:
    26
    Here you go. Anything that will save a few bucks would be a big help. My intention with this is to use the C Beam 1000mm and 250mm bundles for the X and Z, but then extend the framework using 1500mm C Beam (I used 3 pieces of 500 in the model because I couldn't find a 1500 in the sample files) to take advantage of the full range of motion on the X and also account for the size of the rotary headstock and tailstock. Anyway, any design tweaks would be appreciated.
     

    Attached Files:

  5. Rick 2.0

    Rick 2.0 OpenBuilds Team
    Staff Member Moderator Builder

    Joined:
    Dec 20, 2013
    Messages:
    1,099
    Likes Received:
    403
    Here's a quick revision. As you will be bolting it to a table top anyway, unless you have a specific reason for the full perimeter frame there's really no need for it. This reduces the entirety of the frame materials to (2) 1500mm sticks of C-beam.

    Revised Rotary.jpg

    Obviously, the concept shown above is still a bit rough. You will need to work through connections and hold down plates for the framing. You will also want a better connection plate for the z-axis to the x-axis and probably some blocking beneath the end stocks to give you a little more usable diameter on the material.

    As for SketchUp, it is fairly easy to change the length of the extrusions. Right click on the extrusion, click edit component and then you can use the push/pull tool to stretch the end panel to whatever length you need.
     

    Attached Files:

  6. Jon Norris

    Jon Norris Journeyman
    Builder

    Joined:
    Feb 14, 2016
    Messages:
    17
    Likes Received:
    26
    Thanks! That's a big help. Being new to this and reading all the stories about machines that aren't rigid enough, I was trying to come up with a strong frame -- but I guess it was probably overkill. I bow to your expertise, and I appreciate the cost savings.

    I'm guessing some of the 90 degree connector plates and a bunch of cast corner brackets or L brackets will hold all this together and attach it to the table top. I was wondering about the little C Beam gantry to connect Z to X. I'll swap it for the Universal V Slot gantry (It would be awesome if the C Beam actuator bundle would allow that as an upgrade).

    I'll keep playing around with SketchUp. I'm sure I'll figure it out. That was literally the first time I'd ever fired up the app.
     
  7. Rick 2.0

    Rick 2.0 OpenBuilds Team
    Staff Member Moderator Builder

    Joined:
    Dec 20, 2013
    Messages:
    1,099
    Likes Received:
    403
    Cast corner brackets should do the trick for the frame connections. About 36 of them if I counted right. You'll need to extend the 3 base framing members another inch or so beyond the vertical members so you can get the cast brackets front and back. This will also allow for some adjustability when aligning the router bit tip to the center line of the long axis. As far as hold downs, I'd suggest L-Brackets. If you want to save a bit on these, you can always sub in some 3/4" aluminum angle from the local home center. You can usually get a 3' length for around $7.
     
  8. Jon Norris

    Jon Norris Journeyman
    Builder

    Joined:
    Feb 14, 2016
    Messages:
    17
    Likes Received:
    26
    Cool. Extending the 3 base framing members is exactly what I was thinking of doing so I can get the rotary axis lined up. For connecting those to the verticals, you think the cast brackets are sufficient? I was thinking the 90 degree plate connectors, but I guess that could be overkill once again. And thanks for the tip on the aluminum angle.

    Now I just need to figure out what to use for control software and control board. From what I'm reading, it sounds like TinyG is a decent contender. Maybe start there and upgrade to Mach3/Mach4 and a better control board down the road?
     

Share This Page

  • About Us

    The OpenBuilds Team is dedicated helping you to Dream it - Build it - Share it! Collaborate on our forums and be sure to visit the Part Store for all your Building needs!
  • Like us on Facebook

  • Support Open Source FairShare Program!

    OpenBuilds FairShare Give Back Program provide resources to Open Source projects, developers and schools around the world. Invest in your future by helping others develop theirs!

    Donate to FairShare!