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Persnickety Plate Maker

Discussion in 'CNC Mills/Routers' started by motopreserve, Aug 13, 2015.

  1. motopreserve

    motopreserve Veteran
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    motopreserve published a new build:

    Read more about this build...
     
  2. Davey Rance

    Davey Rance Well-Known
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  3. motopreserve

    motopreserve Veteran
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    Thanks @Davey Rance !

    I'll be updating this thread as we move through the process. You have been a HUGE help, and I'm not quite sure if I would have gotten this thing moving without your assistance.
     
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  4. Mark Carew

    Mark Carew OpenBuilds Team
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    Great looking build @motopreserve love the bellows idea you have there as well as the limits :thumbsup:
    Thanks for the share
    Mark
     
  5. motopreserve

    motopreserve Veteran
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    Thanks so much @Mark Carew - could not have done it without you, your parts and the fine video you put together (which made the assembly incredibly painless).

    The bellows are from a post you had a while ago - just cheap Redi-Shades from Home Depot ($7). They are treated paper so will be a consumable if you are using any type of coolant for aluminum, but the single shade can probably provide about 8-10 applications when cut to size.

    I actually need to redesign the mount I had for the bellows in the front of the machine - since the 3D print was getting in the way of the bed when t the far throw of the Y axis. There are 2 tapped holes on the front of the Y end-cap that I can take advantage of to mount this in the future.
     
    #5 motopreserve, Aug 14, 2015
    Last edited: Aug 14, 2015
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  6. Serge E.

    Serge E. Master
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    Nice build. You do bring up a point which was in the back of my mind for the longest of time : looks like many are using MDF or wood for their spoil boards, even to work on material which requires coolant (liquids). How is that working out ? You mention your bellows, being paper based, are only good for a few runs (or a full length as bought can make 8-10 applications). I suspect the MDF spoil board won't like the coolant anymore than the treated paper bellows. In the case of myOX, with a non-treated wood table as a base, I suspect I'll run into other 'liquid' issues as well ... Many also have their electronics and power supply partially or fully exposed to the elements, rather close to the working end of their machines. Aluminium chips and liquids aren't welcome there either, right ? Same thing if the motor is a router (with all of its openings) rather than a spindle (usually sealed or otherwise designed for the task) ?
     
  7. motopreserve

    motopreserve Veteran
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    This is still very much a work in progress. I haven't milled any aluminum yet, so have no experience with the effect of coolant on the MDF or bellows. I would suspect it could warp the board if you soak in on there. The bellows have a coating of plastic/sheen on it - so may be able to withstand some liquid for a bit.

    I plan to use a thicker coolant for this CNC when working with aluminum (unlike the thinner coolant I prefer on my manual machines) for this exact reason, which should prevent the some of the splatter and mess.

    I think if your aluminum chips are making their way to the rear of the machine, and onto the PS/controller, you've probably set something up wrong in the CAM. Fine dust is another matter, and I'm working on a solution to control that - without blocking off the needed air flow to the controller.
     
  8. stargeezer

    stargeezer Veteran
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    I really like several things about your platemaker and congrats on it's build. The ONLY thing I question about it AND the open builds kit is putting the power supply and the control board on the back of the gantry. I suppose if you are not going to run a material that's electrically conductive or coolant, it wouldn't matter. In fact I have a control board on the rear of one of my Ox's too, but it's strictly for use with wood.

    My bigger Oxilla, that was built with aluminum in mind has already experienced one freak failure, so I know it can happen. The VFD is mounted to a panel about 2 foot from the side of the machine. The very first time I tried cutting aluminum, a chip flew almost 4 feet to end up inside the VFD, shorting it out in a very energetic meltdown. $150 and One chip shield later and I was back to work, but it was a very memorable event. It sounded just like a stick welder inside the VFD and never tripped a breaker or blew any fuses. I guess it might have eventually, but I was killing power as fast as I could get to a switch.

    After things had cooled and the air had cleared, I tore the VFD apart looking for the problem. In doing so I didn't find just one chip, there were actually several aluminum chips inside the housing, but it only took one in just the right place to screw up my day.

    Best wishes and keep posting!
    Larry
     
  9. motopreserve

    motopreserve Veteran
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    Larry,

    Thanks so much for the post. In fact you have read my mind - and I have been contemplating how/where to best keep the PS and TinyG because even the little bit of MDF dust I've created (while leveling the bed) has seemed to be attracted to that area like a moth to a flame :)

    The idea of having electronics so close while milling aluminum, or carbon fiber (conductive - but not sure how the dust would behave) seems like an accident waiting to happen. And I would like to keep some air flow going (especially for the TinyG running Nema 23).

    I've been waiting until I move the machine over to the shop for a final solution. The issue will be extending all the wiring to reach a more distant/safe location.

    As a side note, the way I mounted the PS has also proven to be an issue. I chose to mount it so the top was flush with the top of the beam - so that the cable chaser could run a bit over the back to avoid the wheels (I 3D printed some extensions for mounting). But this puts the bottom of the PS in the path of any work traveling on the Y axis, reducing the already modest Z axis capacity.

    So an overhaul is in order - and definitely before I short anything out!
     
  10. motopreserve

    motopreserve Veteran
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    Finally got around to programming slot cuts for the spoiler board so I could install some T-Tracks. I'll keep the solidworks part on file for doing this to future spoilerboards. These T-Tracks definitely point out how small the work area is, but they should come in handy for holding smaller parts. One thing I hadn't taken into account is that these t-tracks have no gaps for taking the nuts in and out. So you either have the nuts permanently installed (would kill too much room), or you need to mill room at the end of the slot. Then I figured out that I could use the machine itself to open up the mouth of the t-track on one end of each of the tracks, so that I can slip the nuts in and out when needed.

    I sunk the T-Tracks a hair lower than the top of the bed, so that I have a bit of leeway for cuts that accidentally go below the bottom of the workpiece. Hopefully that will work out :)

    IMG_3281.JPG IMG_3282.JPG IMG_3283.JPG
     
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  11. Joe Santarsiero

    Joe Santarsiero OB addict
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    Moto,
    Cut your own electronics box....Duuhh! :D
     
  12. stargeezer

    stargeezer Veteran
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    Or if you have a old dead PC sitting around (workstation sized works really good), shell it out and use that. Recycle, reuse, etc. the only real garbage are ashes, and you can make soap with those. OK, perhaps too far.... :)
     
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  13. motopreserve

    motopreserve Veteran
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    Definitely not cutting a box - that would be a job for the 3D printer if anything.

    I have a temp solution for now which seems like it should work fine.
     
  14. motopreserve

    motopreserve Veteran
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    Slight update:

    Finally got around to testing some cuts. The end goal was to be able to get a good cut on piece of G10 for use as a multirotor center plate set.

    The design is pushing the envelope of the bed size - but I was able to make some progress with the stock setup.

    A few tests on line before diving into the G10.

    [​IMG]

    Design laid out on the G10 so that I could confirm the machine is traveling where I expect it to.

    [​IMG]

    Final cut on the G10:

    [​IMG]
     
  15. stargeezer

    stargeezer Veteran
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    Nice job Friend! One of the many things I have wanted to play around with was cutting parts for a quad. I've printed several things with a mixed bag of results - mostly relating to crash testing :) but I think cutting is a far better plan than printing.

    Larry
     
  16. motopreserve

    motopreserve Veteran
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    Thanks! It actually turned out decent for a first attempt. The key here is getting the radius correct for the 4 slots near the corners. This is for a custom folding design in working on.

    Necessity being the mother of invention, these are needed since I have to convert my 900mm hex into a folding X8. Can't fit the **** thing in my apartment after moving back to Brooklyn :)

    I used a diamond cut bit for this - and it seemed to do ok for the G10. I'll be messing with speeds and feeds a little more. The options within HSMxpress are almost overwhelming - but I'm getting it now.... Sort of.
     
  17. motopreserve

    motopreserve Veteran
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    I feel like I'm starting to get the hang of the CAM software a bit more. So many options at first - seemed a bit overwhelming. But slowly, it begins to sink in....

    Second attempt at a multirotor plate. I tried the carpet tape this time as a hold-down, and MAN! I used too much. This stuff is sticky. The good news is that it held it right to he table, despite the semi-dusty MDF. Bad news is I programmed the cuts to travel a hair below the bottom of the stock - and the tape gummed up the bit. Couple quick CAM adjustments and it's fine. Live and learn.

    [​IMG]
     
  18. stargeezer

    stargeezer Veteran
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    FWIW I for one, dig your workshop. while I like all my tools put away in their proper place between projects, any pics of mine that are took mid-project will show a scattering of tools, screws and parts to be assembled. Too organized a work area is a sign of a shop not being used.
     
  19. motopreserve

    motopreserve Veteran
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    Well thanks!

    I don't think I'll ever be accused of having too neat a shop - but then again no one could ever accuse the shop of not getting used either!

    I like to put the tools away when I'm done for the day - that way I don't waste time finding them next time around. But while I'm working, things can get a little crazy.

    Then again, it's only a small home shop. The motorcycle garage stays pretty neat just because there is too much to get lost in. :)
     
  20. stargeezer

    stargeezer Veteran
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    Last year I decided that I really needed to get a few specific machines and tools organized in a way that took up less room. I had a small 4 wheel cart that I could use as a base and in a couple days time I combined;

    1. 20 ton press
    2. Benchtop radial drill
    3. Horizontal bandsaw
    4. A tubing roller (bender)
    5. A metal bender
    6. A ring roller

    All on this cart that measures 30"x60". Each tool can be used to support work being machined on another machine and most importantly, no tool is in the way of another's function. I'm looking for 4 pneumatic jacks that can support the weight of the assembly while it's in use, but so far that has not been any big issue and I've gotten by with wheel chocks when needed. As soon as I get the jack issue figured out I plan to sand blast and paint the entire thing. At present it looks like it fell off a circus truck, but it does exactly what I needed to do when I laid everything out. You would not believe how much floor and bench space it cleared up. That way I could buy more tools. :) Which is one of life's prime directives. :)
     
  21. motopreserve

    motopreserve Veteran
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    You'll have to post a picture of that contraption - because it sounds both amazing and terrifying at the same time! :)

    I'm hard at work building an enclosure that should be able to house the Plate Maker nice and tight - keep the dust inside and make the use of it here at home a little more tolerable. I already had a stand - and although this won't be ideal (slightly cramped), I'm chomping at the bit to get it finished and squared away so I can continue working. All free wood. So can't complain.

    I was just getting the feel for the CAM software - and now would like to concentrate of substituting Universal G-Code Sender for Chilipeppr to see if I can be happy with an offline program. Chilipeppr has its pros, but there are a few bugs that have been frustrating.

    [​IMG]
     
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  22. Mark Carew

    Mark Carew OpenBuilds Team
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  23. stargeezer

    stargeezer Veteran
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    Hi Mark,

    In light of what we had been talking about - our workshops - would adding a category for posting information and pics of our workspaces be feasible? I know I enjoy seeing other guys shops and seeing how they work. Sometimes it can help you solve a problem by just seeing a different arrangement of tools.
     
  24. Joe Santarsiero

    Joe Santarsiero OB addict
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    Hi Geezer,
    Nice idea. Start up a thread over in the general area and show everyone what you're working with.

    Joe
     
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  25. Joe Santarsiero

    Joe Santarsiero OB addict
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    In the general section of the forums. :)
     
  26. motopreserve

    motopreserve Veteran
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    Thanks @Mark Carew

    It's getting there. The top and front will be hinged so that I can still have access. Probably should have done a rear hatch as well for when/if I need to spin the Y axis screw by hand.

    I think this should provide decent protection from dust and debris while still being able to monitor the cuts.

    Then the next step is to rig up the vac system that will travel with the spindle. It will have to come in the top and I have a section of flex hose and some 2.5" Loc-Line to make that happen. I've got a simple aluminum design going for a mount that should bolt nicely to the side of the current spindle mount and extend forward and hold the end of the hose.
     
  27. motopreserve

    motopreserve Veteran
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    "Can you cue the Sanford and Son theme please...."

    Well, it didn't come out pretty, and I still have a few things left to tidy up (like the whole thing!), but I finally have something that will handle the dust in a Brooklyn apartment. As you can imagine - not the best place for using a CNC machine - but you do what you have to.

    It's a hodge-podge of free wood - so I really can't complain. Next step will be to 3D print a box that surround the motor sticking out the side so I can properly mount some filter material.

    Front door opens up as well as the top for access.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  28. Joe Santarsiero

    Joe Santarsiero OB addict
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    I like it!
    You might want to monitor each job though. That thing is a tinder box. ;)
     
  29. motopreserve

    motopreserve Veteran
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    Oh I don't ever leave it. My entire building is a tinder box! :)

    Forgot to mention. Used this enclosure as an excuse to move the electronics out of the way of the dust and debris. Extended the wires (PITA) long enough to have them all rest on the shelf below the machine.
     
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  30. stargeezer

    stargeezer Veteran
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    Does it quiet things down any or is this more for dust control?
     

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