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Water Buffalo - Water jet cut OX+

Discussion in 'CNC Mills/Routers' started by getoffmyland, Jun 3, 2015.

  1. getoffmyland

    getoffmyland Well-Known
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    getoffmyland published a new build:

    Read more about this build...
     
  2. getoffmyland

    getoffmyland Well-Known
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    I am now having a look at cutting and squaring the v-slot.

    Any suggestions on the best way?

    My preferred choice at the moment is to make a jig for the router that allows a square vertical cut across the end of the v-slot that I can "feed" the v-slot into. once one end is square on all pieces I can setup a stop at the far end, set the v-slot in and nibble away to make square and to length.
     
    #2 getoffmyland, Jun 3, 2015
    Last edited: Jun 3, 2015
  3. getoffmyland

    getoffmyland Well-Known
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    This would be the setup with wood guides setup square for the router to ride on and an angle "fence". The good thing with this setup is I can test it on any material to get it right and then all the cuts are repeatable. It is also easy to adapt it for any length required


    vslot cutter 1.PNG


    vslot cutter 2.PNG
     

    Attached Files:

  4. Rick 2.0

    Rick 2.0 OpenBuilds Team
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    I set up a simple V-slot jig to trim ends with. Worked fairly well.

    End Trimming Jig.jpg

    The plate you see at the far end was used to gang multiple similar pieces together so all would be trimmed to the same length. I'd trim one end and then rotate the whole piece and do the other.
     
    Mark Carew, GrayUK and getoffmyland like this.
  5. getoffmyland

    getoffmyland Well-Known
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    thats really cool....

    now I regret not ordering extra v-slot for the future 3d printer build as I could have used it for this
     
  6. Adam Eldeen

    Adam Eldeen Well-Known
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    @getoffmyland looks great what kind of aluminum? How thick is the aluminum? And final question are you happy with it?
     
  7. getoffmyland

    getoffmyland Well-Known
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    I think its 3150... thats what I was told but could be anything, feels strong enough.
    The side plates were going to be 6mm but they only had 4.7mm in stock... again it feels strong enough. the router mounts are 15.5mm

    At the moment I am really happy with it, I guess I wont really be sure until it is fully built and tested. I am still waiting for some screws and bits so I will not know if I have everything in the right spot but I figured it would be a learning process and once I have a machine up and running then version 2 can be started.

    Yesterday I tapped some v-slot (broke the tap on the last hole) so need to either try and remove or go with plan b which is leave that bolt out or use an extra angle bracket there.

    Tonight I built up the X gantry and may start the X carridge if I have some long bolts
     
  8. getoffmyland

    getoffmyland Well-Known
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    I also sanded and polished one of the plates..... not a big fan of it polished. When I was thinking about this project I have an overall plan but things are going to change as I go along

    For the work involved and with the equipment I have its just not worth it. So I tried a scotch brite pad and got a decent brushed finish that looks a lot better. so I am going to remove the major scratches and have a brushed look.

    This thing is not being built to look good anyway, it only needs to work good
     
  9. Adam Eldeen

    Adam Eldeen Well-Known
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    [/QUOTE]The side plates were going to be 6mm but they only had 4.7mm in stock... again it feels strong enough. the router mounts are 15.5mm[/QUOTE]

    I am surprised that would be strong enough. I guess the plates are not that big. Good to know Thanks for the info.
     
  10. Adam Eldeen

    Adam Eldeen Well-Known
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    Try using a DA sander with like about 80 grit. Leaves a matte finish that hides scratches really giod!!!
     
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  11. getoffmyland

    getoffmyland Well-Known
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    I have been asked if I will share the design... I will be posting the files soon, I am just making sure the design is good before posting
     
  12. getoffmyland

    getoffmyland Well-Known
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    I finally got some time to work on the CNC again.... well, I sorted out a "workshop" with some cheap ikea tables and shelves so I am not working on the floor.

    I also started to look at the electronics side of things..... got a parallel post card so I had to do a quick test.

    Anyhow, I hooked up 1 stepper and got it moving...... great!!!!

    so now I am trying to work out the setting and setup..... I have read loads and I think I have a good idea where to start.

    I am running

    Mach 3
    36v 10A power supply
    Nema 23 2.2Nm High torque Stepper 1.8 degree (8 wire)
    TB6600HG - HY-DIV268N-5A Stepper Drivers
    Parallel break out board


    Has anyone go a similar setup? What setting are you using for.....
    1. Stepper drivers - I think I should be set to 2.5A and 1/8 step mode (*edited, i initially quoted max amps and steps)
    2. Stepper motor wiring - Parallel configuration
    3. Mach 3 - I have not even begun to look at settings and tuning... any tips?


    I read a load of things(mostly bad/do do it) about the stepper drivers... I will eventually upgrade to Gecko when I have the cash.... but one question..... I noticed the stepper and driver getting warm... almost hot to the touch..... what is normal for these?
     
    #12 getoffmyland, Jun 21, 2015
    Last edited: Jun 21, 2015
  13. Joe Santarsiero

    Joe Santarsiero OB addict
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    mach3 videos on yt. Paul Campbell is the. channel name....I think.
    The motors and drivers do get warm sometimes hot. They heat up the most when they're powered but not moving. some drivers will cut some of the motor current when they aren't being commanded. This reduces heat. If they're too hot to touch then you probably should dial down on the current. getting some airflow to them is a plus. If possible, heatsinking the drivers also helps.
     
  14. getoffmyland

    getoffmyland Well-Known
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    I have watched a few videos but good to know the "guy" to watch.

    I figured they would heat up while idle and will be making a custom heatsink/mounting for them
     
  15. JustinTime

    JustinTime Master
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    I run my machine for hours and the steppers don't get hot. Not even warm, really, coming to think of it. I had it, at one point, so hot I couldn't touch the motor. Turned out I had the current WAY to high. Dialed it down and I'm good ever since. No heat sinks no nothing. Have your machine up and running and make sure you got the amps dialed in correctly and you probably wont need no heat sinks either. A little on the low side on the amps is perfectly OK and better then a little on the high side.
     
  16. Joe Santarsiero

    Joe Santarsiero OB addict
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    So, those "drivers" are already heatsinked. One problem I've read on them is that there isn't thermal paste between the driver and heatsink. Some users have found that the dip switch settings dont match up with what is printed and others have found that it does! There also seems to be idle current issues where the driver is either stuck in 30% current or never goes into current reduction.
    Here's the thread:http://www.cnczone.com/forums/stepper-motors-drives/186930-tb6600-drive-ebay.html
    And the one that linked to it:http://forum.planet-cnc.com/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=1107
    At this point I think you should figure out what kinda of personality your drives have then work on the relationship from there or reconsider it entirely.:rolleyes:
    @JustinTime
    It's not unusual for motors and drives to be hot. No offense to getoffmyland, but the package he is using is the greatest or most efficient. Its probably why they're sinked to begin with. There are a lot of variables. Enclosure size, machine environment, power supply, load vs. motor characteristics, driver capabilities, etc. Depending on the scenario, adding a heatsink or fan may be necessary and isn't uncommon.
    From the Gecko FAQ:
    Q.) How should I heatsink my drive?

    A.) There is not drive-specific heatsink for any Geckodrive, and there are a variety of ways to heatsink your drive. What you should do is ensure that your heatsink has fins to increase surface area, and have air flowing over it. A good heatsink to use is a standard CPU heatsink with some heatsink compound in between the drive’s plate and the finned aluminum heatsink. The method to determining if it is being cooled adequately is to feel the drive while it is running. If it is uncomfortable to the touch, then the electronics are uncomfortable as well.

    Even though they do not heatsink their drivers, they do realize that it may be necessary under certain circumstances.
    I don't recall who said it, but if you can't hold your hand to a motor or drive for more than 5 seconds and you have the electronics dialed in and operating within spec. then you should sink it or add a fan. This is a great piece of advice, unless you have no feeling in your hands:D

    In the end, it's not unusual for a correctly sized stepper motor and drive to produce a bit of heat around room temp. There are a number of variables to consider when determining why things are heating up and if action should be taken. The tb6600 package might need to be revaluated by getoffmyland. There is certainly some inspection and additional reading to be done. They aren't the best drivers as they seem riddled with problems overall, but if you're on a budget and theyre working for ya, then hey! Adding a fan and/or heatsinking may just be key.
     
  17. Paruk

    Paruk Master
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    I measured the temps on drivers and motors during intensive cutting at ambient temperature of 42 degrees Celsius (!!); the motors didn't go over 50 Celsius and the driver boards were around 48 Celsius (in closed box with two fans, one extracting the other blowing air in). Drivers TB6600 http://www.hotmcu.com/tb6600-1-axis...l?cPath=7_30&zenid=7h0gfih59sfgr61lvjsj9g9kn5 are doing good, but others I had before were total crap. Going for good drivers straight away (Gecko or Leadshine) looks expensive but will save you in the longer run.
     
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  18. getoffmyland

    getoffmyland Well-Known
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    Thanks for the responses all.

    I changed a few settings and did some motor tuning and the temps have cooled down.

    On the Drive/controller package.... I know its not the best.... The plan is to replace when I can afford the Gecko's. I may have a dedicated plasma table in the future so they can move to that when they are replaced so I have not really wasted any money. The main thing is it should get me running for now

    I have done extensive reading on the Drives I have and know about the problems and other issues around them. It was a risk getting them but for the price I was willing to try it just to get me running. It looks like there are various versions and if you get good ones they are not that bad. I look to have good ones where the dip switches are correct and I have good heat sink contact with paste.

    I think the main issue is they are enabled all the time and when there is no movement it generates some heat... I am going to look at using the enable pins to switch to an idle mode.
     
  19. JustinTime

    JustinTime Master
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    @Joe Santarsiero, I agree that heat sinking the drivers is a good idea. It may not be needed but it will not hurt. My response was to the comment
    I read it as saying that the steppers will get a heatsink. That, I think, is not necessary.
     
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  20. boskap

    boskap Journeyman
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    Hi

    Can you Share your Front and Rear Gantry plate for C-Beam Z Axis (DXF or Sketchup)

    Thx Peter
     
  21. getoffmyland

    getoffmyland Well-Known
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    I will put the files up soon... traveling for work at the moment
     
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  22. getoffmyland

    getoffmyland Well-Known
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