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Discussion in '3D printers' started by munchit1, Dec 17, 2014.

  1. munchit1

    munchit1 New
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    hi admin, have you got any proper info on the Vslot beams at all? i have looked about, and asked about...i can longer tolerate the run around basicaly lol...yes i'm ftustrated lol..sy..

    so far i have 15 translasions of 15 interpretasions of yet more key bits of info 'missing' in key area's..

    i dont know of your understandings of hyperdyslexia..but in short its bloody frustrating haveing an IQ and being treeted like dunce based on spelling alone..''yeh theyre dead strong'' is neather quontifiable nor useable! lol!!! ffs!! help!!!

    so.. purleeeze!

    i get the math when all key parts are actualy available....(i.e. it is posable to get an answer with 1 part of a three part formular/equation, whether the answer is usuable is another subject on its own).

    so..

    have you got some proper figures please? what will the beams take with minimal/no beam deflection?

    e.g. 1000mm fixed at each end, how many kilograms at the center will it take without deflecting?

    is there a readable chart some where? one that actualy lists the relavents without having to re trudge through a 5 year degree's work? (fff need the memory jogging...not re writing in todays idiot training scheme lolol..).
     
  2. Rick 2.0

    Rick 2.0 OpenBuilds Team
    Staff Member Moderator Builder

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    0 Kg. (Yes, zero.) The beam will naturally deflect under its own weight. It may be imperceptible to the human eye but it will deflect. That is the nature of all materials. All materials when spanning will deflect some amount under their own weight. Beyond that, the more weight you add, the more they will deflect. There is no magical "start" point that the beam starts to deflect when you add a certain amount of weight. It begins immediately and increases as the load increases. So the real question is not if it deflects as that is a given, the question is how much deflection can your use tolerate.

    No, I am not aware of any calculations having been performed (or at least having been posted here). This is not an engineered system, it is a hobbyist system.
     
  3. munchit1

    munchit1 New
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    thank you,

    so for a 3d printer? a 1 kg load at 1meter... some kind of starting point?...i javent got 400 pounds a vhuck to try it- n-see how it goes unfortunatly for me.

    and the deflexion is over time..e.g antique glass actualy settles towards the bottom within its own latice structure.
     
  4. Rick 2.0

    Rick 2.0 OpenBuilds Team
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    The best I can offer would be for a 1 kg load on a simply supported 1 m length of 20x20 with the load at the center deflection visually measures approximately .6 mm. (I don't have access to a proper testing lab or apparatus so that's the best I can offer.)
     
  5. Tweakie

    Tweakie OpenBuilds Team
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    Hi Munchit,

    As Rick says; ' All materials when spanning will deflect some amount under their own weight. Beyond that, the more weight you add, the more they will deflect.' so you may have to just have to try it and see if the deflection (under your intended load) is within your acceptable limits.


    :)


    '
    If left undisturbed at room temperature, glass really doesn’t change—no matter how old it is—says Michael Cima, Professor of Materials Science and Engineering and Faculty Director of the MIT Glass Lab. Contrary to the urban legend that glass is a slow-moving liquid, it’s actually a highly resilient elastic solid, which means that it is completely stable. So those ripples, warps, and bull’s eye indentations you see in really old pieces of glass “were created when the glass was created,” Cima says. They are the result of old-fashioned glass fabrication methods, not aging.'

    Tweakie.
     
  6. munchit1

    munchit1 New
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    Rick, thank you, apreciated.

    Trweakie, ahh that doesnt suprise me..lol
     

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