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Recommendations for a noob build

Discussion in 'CNC Mills/Routers' started by c5dad, Dec 13, 2015.

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  1. c5dad

    c5dad New
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    Good day all,

    I am in the process of looking at which build would be a good launch point. I notice that there is the Routy, the Ox and others.

    My focus will be some wood but mostly aluminum milling for telescope parts and non-critical motorcycle parts to cover my hobbies. I see in the near future of needing to mill upwards of 12+ inch parts and long term upwards of 24" parts (both short dim in x-y. I would need to be able to mill full depth of 1 inch. I did use mills in my pre-engineer life past, so am looking forward to a new precision tool.

    So the question is which build to start? The Routy looks to be a clean first build, though not sure of how robust it would be long term. It looks as if the Ox has more capability to be modified with longer rails in the future. I am thinking that there will be less internal resistance (wife factor) with an easily upgradable unit.

    Thanks for any guidance you can provide.
    Chris
     
  2. Steve Fox

    Steve Fox Veteran
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    I'm biased, but I would choose one of two options:
    The first is the OX. I built one that has a working area of 25.5" x 37".
    It does a fairly good job, although I still have some minor issues to address before it is perfect.
    One problem is that you have to get parts from many sources to build it.
    If I were you, I would start with a smaller version because the one I have takes up a lot of room.
    Maybe 500mm x 500mm.
    All the parts are reusable if you want to go to a larger machine. Just make sure you leave enough wire to add the longer extrusions, unless you don't mind rewiring the whole machine.
    It just so happens that the first job I actually got paid for required machining 18" x 32" plywood.
    I'm glad I started with a machine that large.

    The second choice I would recommend is this one:
    C-Beam Machine Mechanical Bundle

    It is much smaller, but designed for just what you want to do.
    All the mechanical parts are included in the package, you just need to order the motors, controllers, power supply and some other miscellaneous parts.
     
  3. Rick 2.0

    Rick 2.0 OpenBuilds Team
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    If you plan on doing mostly aluminum and need 24" I would suggest a C-Beam derivative of the OX platform. This will offer better precision and power for the cutting of aluminum than a belted version. Brief discussion beginning here (spanning across several pages). There are a couple of other designs along the same line to be found in the cnc section of the forum. @Chris Laidlaw offers plates for a version he worked up with a couple other members. Something in the 500mm x 1000mm range should do what you seek.

    As far as upgrading goes, build what you need the first time. When you add up the value of the parts you will be tossing out and the additional shipping cost for their replacements, you will quickly see the wisdom in this.
     
  4. snokid

    snokid Master
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    second the choice of a ox - cbeam build....
    500mm x 1000mm is also a good starting point depending on the size of the room you have.

    So what you would need to start is
    [email protected] 1000mm c-beam Linear Actuator Bundle
    [email protected] 500mm c-beam Linear Actuator Bundle
    [email protected] 250mm c-beam Linear Actuator Bundle
    spindle mount
    some hardware and plates(which could be made with simple tools till you had it up and running)
    electronics (Arduino cnc shield), power supply(24v)
    That's the way I would do it...
    Bob
     
  5. c5dad

    c5dad New
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    Thank you. I was wondering about the C-beam option. Glad that my plans are not too much of a jump for a first build. Will be ordering the parts over the next week or so. Cannot wait to start the build. Must remember ear plugs for that potentially loud and high pitch noise emanating from within the house!

    Chris
     
    #5 c5dad, Dec 13, 2015
    Last edited: Dec 14, 2015
  6. c5dad

    c5dad New
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    In working through the BoM spreadsheet, is it safe to presume that I need:
    • Base (using C-beam??)
    • 2-1000mm linear actuator bundles (x-axis),
    • 1-500 mm actuator bundle (y-axis) ,
    • 1-250 mm actuator bundle (z-axis),
    • BoM quantities for "screws and such" and "electronics and such"
    As for space, my oversized garage can handle it with some, er, de-cluttering of a heavy workbench.

    Thanks again!
     
    #6 c5dad, Dec 14, 2015
    Last edited: Dec 14, 2015
  7. Rick 2.0

    Rick 2.0 OpenBuilds Team
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    You need to work through a design concept first rather than just trying to put it together from a BOM. On the gantry beam for example, using the inset wheels that come as a part of the 500mm C-beam bundle won't lead to good results. You need outset solid V-wheels there and a standard gantry plate. Gantry side plates will also be an issue that you will want to resolve prior to ordering any OB parts.
     
  8. snokid

    snokid Master
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    As you as just starting out you might not be comfortable with a cad program (sketchup-free is like the standard with openbuilds)
    You can just sketch it out on a sheet of paper.
    as far as the base, you could use c-beam but standard v-slot rail is cheaper.
    As rick states having the wheels just on the inside of the rail might not give you the strength you are looking for. If you look at the ox build there are wheels that ride on the v-slot rail top and bottom, So you could have them inside the rail and top and bottom, or just do the top and bottom.
    I have an ox and a c-beam machine. One day when my projects don't exceed my free time I will build another cnc what I was thinking I would do is buy 2 C-Beam Gantry Sets per rail then space them out about 10" on each axis. So 2 gantry sets per ox plate if that makes sense....

    the other area of concern is the z axis pay attention to this area easy not to make it rigid enough...
    Bob
     
  9. c5dad

    c5dad New
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    Rick, thanks for strait ending my coordinate system out - in the computer modeling that I have done (air dispersion) x is along my long axis. Glad we are not using polar! And thanks for the tips on wheels. I was looking at the BOM as a kickoff to better understand the way this puzzle is assembled.

    Bob, points well taken. On the z-axis I can visualize a momentum arm due to potential lack of rigidity. Not to forget the torque from the motor as well. As for CAD, I have used pencilcad for the good ol #2HB for a long time. I do have access to autocad that one of my engineers uses frequently, though sketch up is more my speed.

    I found out c-beam is back ordered so I am in no rush and hoping to get a plum design taken care of this week due to my vacation days that need to be taken or lost (as usual).

    I appreciate the assist!
     
    #9 c5dad, Dec 14, 2015
    Last edited: Dec 14, 2015
  10. snokid

    snokid Master
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  11. c5dad

    c5dad New
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    Thanks for the link! I am still working my through this site with my free time - whatever that is.
     

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