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The best cutting and squaring method??

Discussion in 'General Talk' started by David V.F. Burton, Dec 24, 2015.

  1. David V.F. Burton

    David V.F. Burton Well-Known
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    Hey all..

    I have ordered many pieces of V-Slot from openbuilds, but unfortunately I have received rail of different length.
    So to explain, I have three pieces of 20X20X500mm but all three pieces are not the same length, and the difference is up to 2mm between them.. I have also received other widths of multiple lengths..
    mostly the difference is just in the 1/2mm to 2mm range..

    This is causing several squaring issues..

    So my question is: What would be the best, yet not too expensive tool for cutting my rail to the same length and ending up with square ends..

    Although that sounds like a simple question, it actually isn't.. Miter boxes and miter saws have play in their 90 degree setting.. even with framing squares, you really can't be accurate in the mm range..

    So, I wish to have the most accuracy over 1,500mm after cutting down my rail..

    What have you, out there found to be the best device for making the rail square after cutting?

    Thank You in advance for your answers..
     
  2. GrayUK

    GrayUK Master
    Staff Member Moderator Builder

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    Remember the term "KISS". Keep It Simple.
    You are right about the accuracy of set squares and the like, but remember the best measuring tool for right angles is a piece of A4 paper folded along one of it's own straight edges to give you a 90 degree angle. It has too, it's a law of Geometry.
    Then use that tool, make yourself a simple, but accurate, Jig from wood and, using a Rip Saw with an appropriate blade, slowly make your cuts. Yes I have a chop saw I use, but when I think about all the time it takes to check and double check for movement, I might just as well have used a home made Jig for the job, which cannot change.
    Remember, "KISS"

    Gray
     
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  3. Rick 2.0

    Rick 2.0 OpenBuilds Team
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    If you have a router and a guide bushing, it is fairly simple to set up a jig to run across the ends. Gang all matching extrusions together with tape and this will square and even them all up at once.
     
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  4. David V.F. Burton

    David V.F. Burton Well-Known
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    Cool, Thank You..

    I think I can combine both these ideas :)

    Thank You Gray for not mentioning that second "S" ;)

    After I get the first bits shaved down and squared up with Rick and Gray's suggestions, I think I will have to create some sort of an extremely over complicated cutter bot. Probably involving dominos some how :) (Rube is my hero)

    So I will fold some paper, make a jig and then router it..

    Thank You
     
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  5. Rick 2.0

    Rick 2.0 OpenBuilds Team
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    The jig I use is made up of V-slot and mini V-wheels but the same idea could readily be accomplished out of 1x lumber, using router guide bushings.

    [​IMG]
     
  6. David V.F. Burton

    David V.F. Burton Well-Known
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    That is really cool, it is almost exactly what I just started on but better..
    I have a whole gob of v-slot and a couple of gantry plates and tons of bits and bobs to tack it all together, but I think I will scrap my design and replicate yours..

    And on Monday (when the last couple of bits I forgot to get on my last order) arrive in the mail, I will have a complete OX to mill a router plate :)
    Had forgotten the timing gears for the NEMA 23's , so the whole thing is sitting here with no way to move the gantry :)

    Thank You very much for taking the time to share the photo..
     
  7. GrayUK

    GrayUK Master
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    Hi Rick.
    What sort of router bit would you use for trimming aluminium?
     
  8. Rick 2.0

    Rick 2.0 OpenBuilds Team
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    I'm just using a carbide 2 flute spiral up-cut, nothing special. I really don't know much about bits or even it this is the correct bit but it seems to work fine. It has a 1" cutting depth so it more than covers the 20mm required.
     
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  9. Julius

    Julius Veteran
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    You can use wood bits on aluminum, just wear some safety glasses, take shallow passes, and maybe slow down the RPM if you can.
     
  10. Makerparts

    Makerparts Journeyman
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    Ive heard really good things about the Dewalt DW872 Cold Saw.
     
  11. DiggerJ

    DiggerJ Master
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    I use a 80 or 100 tooth blade on my well maintained table saw. I get the length as close as I can, and cut a scrap piece of wood to check my measurements. when right, I cut away.

    Oh yeah, when you start cutting 1000mm and 1500mm lengths down to 500mm, you quickly appreciate the "little extra" that the send on the lengths. It is usually enough to account for the saw blade kerf width.

    My feeling is that if you want a precision printer, you should always saw to length. If you expect that purchased pieces from ANYWHERE are going to be perfect, you will be let down. I have had people say that misumi cuts are dead on, but I suspect that is because close is good enough for them. We have had some through our Makerspace and they are close, but not perfect.

    If you want to be able to fine tune the printer when finished, you need to pay very close attention to all of the lengths, angles, and individual parts to make sure everything is same, same. It will save you from pulling out your hair later.
     
  12. Ronald van Arkel

    Staff Member Resident Builder Builder

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    I'm using a 12" mitter-box, 96t non-ferrous blade. First I make a rough cut and then I scrape off about 0.5mm. This will reduce the error margin machine-play will give you and the cut looks better as well. When I'm designing a machine, I always use 245, 495, 995 and 1495mm lengths as ends of the V-Slot are never straight and beat up.

    -Ronald
     
  13. lofton

    lofton Well-Known
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    I always turn to my table saw for getting square cuts. Rather than use a standard miter gauge, a cross-cut sled is the best; the material being cut rides on the sled and is not dragged across the table surface. Stops can be attached to the sled.for making cuts of identical lengths. I'm fortunate to have good tools for woodworking, the table saw the most important. Use a non-ferrous blade, of course and wear eye protection without fail!
     

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